Blog Strategically: How to Get it Done and Get it Read

How to blog strategically for long-term results

by Janice Campbell

“What a waste of time,” grumbled a writer at a recent conference. He was responding to yet another speaker’s suggestion that a blog is one of the simplest and best marketing tools for an author or freelancer. I’ve gotten used to hearing complaints, excuses, and grumbling whenever blogs are mentioned, but I’ve also noticed how fast the whining dries up the first time a fan or client approaches, and starts a dialogue by mentioning, “I read on your blog…”.

How to blog strategically.

For every writer or editor who sees the blogosphere as the anonymous, overwhelming clacking of a billion voices, there’s another who is quietly and effectively using a blog to communicate with readers and clients, and another who uses a blog as a thought-catcher, catalog of ideas, or a place to judge interest in a possible article or book topic. A blog can be used in any way you choose, but the two most important things you need to do are to get it done and get it read.

Get it Done

1- Decide the purpose of your blog. Do you want to establish a rapport with readers? Sell books? Get new clients for your writing or editing services? Your decision will help you determine your tone and what you write about.

2- Decide when and how often you’ll post. I recommend no less than once a week, so that your readers will have something to look forward to. Try to post on the same day each week, and remember that mid-day Tuesday-Thursday is usually the best time to post. People are often to busy to read blogs on Monday, and on Friday, they’re looking forward to the weekend, and not ready to do anything extra.

3- Decide what to write about. If you’re going to post once a week, you’ll need 52 short articles. Get a calendar with all major holidays marked, and begin listing topics on your chosen blog day. You can use a holiday as a springboard for posts; offer news about your book sales or your business; review other books your readers might find interesting; share news from the publishing or freelance world; whine a bit about your current project (this is recommended only if you do so in a funny way); share a great quote or poem; and so much more. If you’re stuck for a topic, post something you wrote long ago, write a response to someone else’s blog, or just post an inspiring quote.

Get it Read

1- Feedburner: Your blog posts can be send directly to subscriber mailboxes using Feedburner, a Google service. Add your blog feed, then click on its title to get to the screen where you can “Analyze, Optimize, Publicize, Monetize, and Troubleshootize” your feed. Take a little time to look at the options offered, and use these free tools tools to send your feed to where it can be read.

2– Blog Carnival: A blog carnival is a gathering of blog posts on a single topic such as writing, business, or organization. Search the blog carnival site for carnivals you’d like to contribute to, then click on “Submit a Post,” and fill out the brief form. Your post will be included (at the carnival owner’s discretion) in the next issue of the carnival. If you choose an active carnival that is posted regularly, this can bring your blog to the attention of many new readers who may in turn share it with others.

3- Incoming Links: Links are the lifeline of any website, and blogs are well-positioned to benefit from them. If you have a NAIWE blog, you already have a head start on incoming links, but you’ll want to gather more by announcing each of your blog posts on social media. Some of the simplest and most useful links come from sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Digg, StumbleUpon, and Delicious. You can use as service such as Hootsuite or Edgar to pre-schedule updates so that they’re optimally spaced. (To view the social media sites listed above, just type each name into your browser bar and add .com.)

There are other ways to get your blog read, including blog tours, guest blogging, webrings, and blogroll exchanges, but the first three options will get you started.

Great Blog Examples

It’s a good idea to study successful blogs to see what makes them work. Remember, though, that each of these blogs has been up for a long time, so there’s enough content to draw readers. You can’t start with a hundred posts, but you can start with one, and build from there. Little by little, bit by bit, you’ll create a site that connects you with readers and clients, and meets the objectives you set when you began planning. Here are five blogs that offer very different examples. Enjoy reading, then plan your own and get started.

Seth Godin writes a long-standing blog that supports his non-fiction writing career. He’s created a vast following for his interesting posts, and that’s translated to great sales for each of his books. Here’s a good sample post: When a stranger reads your blog.

Copyblogger is where blogger Brian Clark shares his expertise in frequent, information-packed posts. He also hosts guest bloggers, which a good way for a blogger to add fresh content without having to write it all.

QueryShark is the blog where agent Janet Reid shreds reader queries. It’s definitely blood-in-the-water writing, and it gives you a strong taste of Reid’s personality and working style. She does it all in a spirit of helpfulness, and you’ll learn a lot by reading it. For Reid, it’s not just an act of charity or wicked fun–it’s smart marketing that draws potential clients like flies to a sticky bun.

Rachelle Gardner, another literary agent, offers a kinder, gentler tone on her blog on all things related to publishing. Her site is professional, attractive, and consistent.

Michael Hyatt, the CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers, is an avid blogger, and his posts are always meaty and thought-provoking. He writes about publishing and life, and manages to promote his company, his speaking services, and his author’s books in a low-key, entertaining way.

The Cozy Chicks blog is a great example of group blog. Seven writers of cozy mysteries have teamed up to create a blog that helps to market their work while building rapport with readers and fans. It’s an excellent way to share the blogging load and have fun in the process.

Beyond these examples, be sure to look at the blog feed of the NAIWE member blogs.

Janice Campbell is Director of the National Association of Independent Writers and Editors. She has been writing, speaking, and coaching since the 1980’s.

 

Crowdfunding: An Introduction, Part Two

What are the steps toward crowdfunding? 

Here is Part One of this article.

A solid plan will make your crowd funding campaign a reality. At this point you might be wondering how crowdfunding works and how to get started with a campaign. Here’s a quick breakdown of the basic steps to initiate a crowdfunding campaign:

  • Choose a crowdfunding platform. There are several crowdfunding platforms available, each varying somewhat, appealing to different audiences and offering different services. Prospective campaigners should research which platform would be the best fit for their project.
  • Create a campaign. A crowdfunding campaign is a way for project creators to tell their audience who they are and what makes their project important. Campaigners can use photos, upload a video, provide a summary and devise reward levels to entice supporters. Reward levels should be cost effective, but offer a value and/or something unique and individual to those pledging support.
  • Develop a marketing plan. People won’t simply find a project and financially pledge towards it unless the project is enticing and has momentum. It’s the job of the campaign creator to build that initial buzz, so it’s important to have a solid marketing plan in place before the launch of a campaign.
  • Promote and ask for support. Campaigners must reach out to their network and ask for support and help in spreading the word about the campaign. The more traffic the creator is able to drive to the campaign, the more momentum it will build.  Shareability amongst supporters will increase if the campaign is exciting and the story compelling. How well the campaigner markets his or her story will very often be the great determining factor of success.
  • Use the funds raised to bring your project to life. The campaigner will receive the funds and use them to make their project a reality.

Why Pubslush? 

Another question you might have:  “What makes Pubslush different than other crowdfunding platforms?Here are a few key differences:

  • Pubslush fosters a vibrant community of writers, readers, publishers and industry professionals and focuses on books and literary projects.
  • A flexible funding model allows authors to reach for the stars with their overall funding goal, but allows them to keep the funds they raise as long as they reach their minimum funding goal.
  • Personalized service that provides hands-on campaign support.
  • Authors have accessibility to their own reader database and supporter analytics that provides authors with relevant campaign information detailing demographics and contact information.
  • Buy Now feature that continues to drive traffic to the sales of the book post-campaign and inclusivity to the Pubslush community indefinitely.
  • Lowest platform fee in the industry at 4%.
  • The Cause, which allows authors to participate in social good by giving back to worldwide literacy initiatives.

What’s next?

If you think crowdfunding is right for you, stop by Pubslush to learn more. Our team is always available to answer any and all questions you may have. We know publishing a book is a long and sometimes confusing process, which is why we’re always here to help.

Pubslush: Crowdfunding for writers.Justine Schofield is the development director of Pubslush, a global crowdfunding platform for the literary world that provides a way to raise funds and tangibly pre-market books and literary-based projects. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston, she is currently pursuing her MFA in Creative Writing at Lesley University. Justine has become a prominent voice in the publishing industry and an advocate for educating authors and publishers about crowdfunding. She has contributed to IBPA’s Independent magazine, Self-Publishers Monthly, Book Marketing Magazine, Business Banter and many more online publications. She has spoken on panel discussions about crowdfunding for authors and continues to foster the growth and development of crowdfunding within the publishing process. She tweets for @pubslush. Connect with her on LinkedIn.

Crowdfunding: An Introduction, Part One

What is Crowdfunding?

Crowdfunding harnesses the power of community.Crowdfunding is a rapidly growing industry that caters to entrepreneurs and business-savvy creatives and gives them the power to fund and market their projects in the pre-production phase. Conducting a crowdfunding campaign requires time and effort, but can help to secure a more successful product launch.

How does crowdfunding help authors?

Crowdfunding for authors is quickly gaining traction as an essential step in the publishing process. Crowdfunding is conducive to the publishing process and offers an array of benefits aside from simply raising funds. Crowdfunding can help authors to:

  • Collect pre-orders.  Reward-based crowdfunding allows authors to create tiered reward levels as a way to thank and entice their supporters. The most obvious reward an author can offer to their supporters is their book, so crowdfunding essentially provides a platform to facilitate a pre-order campaign to a wide audience of readers.
  • Employ a marketing campaign before publication. The marketing efforts for a book must begin well before publication, but it’s very difficult to talk about a product that hasn’t been produced yet. A crowdfunding campaign provides a landing page to drive traffic and connect with readers in the pre-publication phase.
  • Build an author brand. Since a crowdfunding campaign must offer a range of reward levels, authors are forced to think about what other services or items of value they can offer their supporters. Realistically, in order for an author to make a living writing, they need to incorporate other services into their branding, such as speaking, coaching, etc. Creating reward levels can help authors build their brand by determining what else they have to offer their audience.
  • Network expansion and platform building. A crowdfunding campaign encapsulates the author in a way that isn’t possible through traditional channels. Authors can connect with their audience on a personal level, tell their story and include links to their website and social media. The personalization of a crowdfunding campaign is part of its appeal and is often how authors gain support from readers outside of their network.
  • Engage with readers. A crowdfunding campaign allows the creator to engage with supporters.  Access to an evolving database of readers can be very useful and provide authors with valuable insight, as well as a foundation for future promotional efforts.

In Part Two of this article, you’ll learn about steps toward crowdfunding, as well as a bit about Pubslush, a crowdfunding service for writers.

Pubslush: Crowdfunding for writers.

Justine Schofield is the development director of Pubslush, a global crowdfunding platform for the literary world that provides a way to raise funds and tangibly pre-market books and literary-based projects. A graduate of Emerson College in Boston, she is currently pursuing her MFA in Creative Writing at Lesley University. Justine has become a prominent voice in the publishing industry and an advocate for educating authors and publishers about crowdfunding. She has contributed to IBPA’s Independent magazine, Self-Publishers Monthly, Book Marketing Magazine, Business Banter and many more online publications. She has spoken on panel discussions about crowdfunding for authors and continues to foster the growth and development of crowdfunding within the publishing process. She tweets for @pubslush. Connect with her on LinkedIn.

Don’t Let Book Marketing Fears Keep You From Achieving Success by Brian Feinblum

leap to success
Not everyone can write a book. Not everyone can sell a product. As an entrepreneurial writer, you will need to do both – or outsource your book marketing.   Do you have any of these fears that hold you back from executing a book marketing campaign?
1, I don’t think I have enough resources – time and money.
2. I am not sure my book is better than others.
3. I don’t like to sound like I am begging.
4. I don’t want to appear to be too pushy.
5. I fear rejection.
6. I am afraid I will be asked questions that I don’t know the answers to.
7. I am not sure what to do to be convincing.
8. I don’t like to talk to others.
9. I am not confident about my appearance.
10. I don’t know what to say.
11. What if they don’t like me?
12. What if they laugh or yell at me?
The key to conquering any fear is to acknowledge it, seek solutions, and to get help. Or admit defeat and hire others to help you. Or to be content with the negative consequences that your fears tend to bring about. To overcome your book marketing fears simply jump in the water and start selling. You may just learn to swim.

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2013 ©

Battle for Book Sales Beyond Amazon by Brian Feinblum

                                      Market Share
The marketplace for books – whether print, digital, or audio – is clearly owned by Amazon. They account for 27% of total units sold, as of October 1, 2012, according to RR Bowker. They improved from 21% a year earlier. Barnes & Noble declined to 16%, down from 17%. But after these two retailers, no single company scored in the double digits. In fact, no single category of sales channel hit double digits. Here’s how the rest of the book marketplace breaks down:
·         All independent bookstores, combined, account for only 6% of units sold:
·         Other e-book and audio download sites equal 6%
·         Other ecommerce sites account for 6%
·         All book clubs account for 5%
·         Discount, closeout and thrift stores equal 5%
·         Walmart – 4%
·         Non-traditional bookstores – 3%
·         Warehouse clubs – 3%
·         Christian bookstores – 2%
·         Target – 2%
·         Books-A-Million – 2%
·         Supermarkets – 1%
·         All other means = 12%
The book marketing battlefield runs beyond bookstores or e-commerce sites. Books are everywhere and nowhere. But however they are sold, there is no doubt that sales will always be driven by savvy book marketing and the garnering of news media coverage. Word of mouth makes a big difference but only once there is a critical mass of interest that builds up form marketing exposure. Publishers and authors will continue to identify their target readers, sell their books everywhere in every form, and market to their core readers. Promote – or perish!

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2013 ©

What’s In Your Book Marketing Tool Kit? by Brian Feinblum

marketing-tools
Your best resource to market your book is you. Reach out to the people you know and those that they know.  Your book will get discovered if you market your book utilizing these 31 tools:
1.     Facebook
2.     Linked In
3.     Google +
4.     Twitter
5.     Pinterest
6.     Web site
7.     E-mail
8.     Business card and Name
9.     Logo
10.   Directories and lists to sell to
11.   Your blog
12.  Other bloggers
13.  Skype
14.  FreeConferenceCall.com
15.  Texting
16.  YouTube
17.  Fring, QikVideo, Facetime
18.  Webinars
19.  Podcasts
20.  Apps
21.  FourSquare
22.  Spoke.com
23.  AroundMeApp.com
24.  TimeTrade.com
25.  EmailFinder.com
26.  Focus.com
27.  SalesForce.,com
28.  Data.com
29.  Spokeo.com
30.  GoToMeeting.com, Webex.com, FreeScreenSharing.com
31.  FreeOnlineSurveys.com, SurveyMonkey.com, Zoomerang.com, KwikSurveys.com
Good luck!

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2013 ©

Welcome To Book World, The Greatest Theme Park by Brian Feinblum

Camelot_Theme_ParkHow come there aren’t any theme parks dedicated to books and publishing? I think it is a billion-dollar idea waiting to be acted upon. I am sure one day we’ll see billboards or Groupons for AmazonWorld – or maybe Barnes & Noble Land. Wouldn’t you bring your family and friends to a place that celebrates ideas and creativity, that honors the written word and free speech, and that makes reading fun?

o

This past week I had the pleasure of taking my wife and two young kids to several theme parks in Orlando. Never mind that the parks only cater to people who can afford to drop $100 per person per day, who pay for the right to then purchase overpriced food and licensed products that further promote their properties. I also had to pay the tourist tax (speeding ticket) for trying to turn a 180-mile trek to Boynton Beach from the parks into a quicker excursion. We had a great time and know we’ll be back again – albeit with a lighter wallet.
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The theme parks have the right idea – they hype their existing content and repackage it in a way that makes it appealing to all ages. If movie studios can do this, why not publishers or those in the book industry?

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Books connect to everything because they are written about everything – real and imagined, past, present, and future. A theme park can show what a book looks like in different languages. It can show us how books are treated globally or culturally. It can show us how books entertain, educate, enlighten, or inspire. Books, like the Bible, can be powerful, or they can be merely thrill-seeking, like Fifty Shades of Grey. The park can reflect a diversity of thought, significance, creativity, and commercialism.
o
Maybe bookstores should be turned into theme parks. Then they’d become entertaining destinations and people would want to be where books are.
o
Publishing has a lot to play with. It has tradition. It has so many facets to explore – the legal side, the cultural side, literacy, how books influence people and societies, and how our history is preserved in books. There are millions of words in millions of books and not one theme park is dedicated to them.
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We have grand museums, mainly dedicated to art, history, and science. We have immense zoos and circuses to highlight nature and animals. Every industry has a hall of fame. Businesses have conventions. There are county fares, championship sporting events, and theme parks, and amusement parks and huge concert arenas. But no publishing theme parks.
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Can’t we muster together a little bit of Trump extravagance and apply it to books and come up with a place that exceeds what is offered at the biggest palaces of fun in the world? The parks could be divided into so many unique sections that highlight interesting aspects of the book industry, such as:

·         Ranking the best-sellers of all time
·         Examining historically-significant books
·         The evolution of publishing technology
·         The history of the printed word
·         The future of books and all formats
·         Books turned into audiobooks, TV shows, movies, plays, etc.
·         How books are written
·         How they are acquired, edited, packaged, sold, promoted
·         Self-publishing
·         E-book mania
·         Era-specific books such as 18th century romantic poets or 1950’s Sci-fi
·         Region-specific books such as those by or about the south
·         Book-specific such as Catcher in the Rye or Chicken Soup for the Soul
·         Author-specific such as the works of John Grisham or Janet Evanovich

·         Genre-specific such as what’s new in erotic vampire thrillers or diet and fitness

Think of what can be sold:
·         Food
·         Games/Toys
·         DVDs
·         CDs
·         Clothes
·         Stuffed animals of book characters
·         Replicas of things referenced in the books
·         …and BOOKS!
There can be displays that include:
·         Book showcases
·         Videos
·         Rides
·         Games
·         Lectures
·         Readings
·         Reenactments
·         Workshops
·         Concerts
·         Tricia contests

·         Historic manuscripts, printing presses, e-book devices

Maybe there’d be a university on site, a special academy that is a school for writers and those who want to work in the book publishing industry.
o
There could be sections for adults and children. There could be sections of books highlighting industries such as automotive, gardening, or sales. There could be a hobby section, a fantasy section, a children’s section – really, you could put anything in the park as long as it relates to books. And everything connects to books.

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Of course,, some might say the best way to honor books is to buy and read them, share them, and live them. But imagine a place where bibliophiles can  call home, a place that is part library, bookstore, e-reader, Web site, Disney, Vegas, Indy 500, Miss America Pageant, Mall of the Americas, Mardi Gras, and Time Square?

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Take me to BookWorld – or write a book about such a place. BookWorld should exist and needs to. Books are still popular but they also are under many threats. It is not government censorship or Communism or war that threatens us. It is cultural laziness, a degraded education system, economics, and entertainment competition that puts books in danger. BookWorld could be a great boost not only for the publishing industry, but it can be fun for the whole family.

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Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2013 ©

Apps To Zoom Past Books in 2014 by Brian Feinblum

apps picture

Apps are expected to generate $25 billion this year – up 62% from a year ago. They are expected to double 2013’s numbers by 2015, when over $50 billion in revenue will have been generated.

There are 1.4 million apps available between Google and Apple, but 64% of them are free. The app sales, which average $3.18 per app bought for iphones, will exceed the entire book market by this time next year.

Windows only has 125,000 apps and Amazon has a paltry 70,000, so if either one builds on its app business, we may see an even bigger expansion of an already exploding sector.

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2013 ©

Can Any Book Survive the Future? by Brian Feinblum

Renior for Test of Time All creative artists want their work to be embraced by a loving public, even long after they are dead. They want to leave a legacy and to be appreciated by others. It doesn’t matter if it’s art, film, books, architecture, or other forms of creation – the desire and drive of all creators is the same.

Sure, some are ego-driven, money-hungry, fame-seekers, but all, at the heart of their efforts, want to see their work valued and to know it’s inspired, enlightened, entertained, and informed others. They want to know they sparked a dialogue, provoked action, stimulated thought and led to a change in society or impacted lives. Writers want to think that they created something not just for today or for a generation, but something everlasting and permanent.

The truth is it doesn’t work that way. Not at all.

I was in the public library the other day to help my eight-year-old son do research for a school report he was writing for his second-grade class. While he looked for books about the Blue Iguana of the Cayman Islands (we found none), I happened upon a volume entitled “Colonial History to 1877.” As I flipped through the book I realized how much has happened in our nation’s history of nearly 237 years but I said to my son: “You know, there will come a time when all of the history you will spend your school years learning, will be taught in a day.”

Eventually there will be little difference between 1813, 1913 or 2013, because so much history will have taken place over the years. Here’s what will happen:

· The more recent history of the present era will always seem more significant and important than the distant past.
· So many more significant things will happen in the centuries to come that by the time it is 2513, to reflect on the quaint times of today will seem insignificant.
· As time goes by, the time dedicated to studying history will be replaced, in part, to be used to learn new skills that future technologies will bring about.

Our ability to record news, find facts, publish analysis and share information will overwhelm the education system and forbid it to properly give students enough time to discuss any specific event or subject in great detail.

Every year that goes by, the amount of classroom time spent learning about history generally remains the same but the amount of time put to any one event or person generally shrinks because more history is created and has to be covered. History books have three decades of history and five more presidents to write about since I graduated high school in 1984.

How much longer will the school year need to be in order to properly cover future history? I calculated I spent about an hour per day in class on history – some 2160 school hours (an hour per school day, 180 days per year, 12 years). That is about 10 hours dedicated per every year of this nation’s history. That means another 290 hours of instruction would be needed just to cover the last 29 years. What will that come to in 100 years? 1000 years? 10,000 years?

So, I come back to my opening remarks about the lifespan of a creative artist’s work, especially books. We still read old books – the Bible, works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and some ancient texts, but compared to all that has been written and published, how many books are read well beyond an author’s lifetime? Books expire. They have a shelf-life even if they can exist forever online. Relevance, discoverability, language – all of these things doom most books.

But it does not stop us from writing as if our words will last forever. Heck, before we can think about our works being read and enjoyed a century from now, we struggle to find readers today. But we can strive to write today and hope the words live another day.

The odds of being read today are much greater than they will be even next week, when, at least 7,000 more books will have been published by traditional publishers. Write as if you’ll be read tomorrow, but hope to be read today.

Remember these words, for chances are they won’t live beyond your lifetime: Create, because you reflect the truth. Create, because you need an alternate to the truth. Create, because you don’t know the truth. Create, to inspire greater truths.

History will tell us what really was true, if only history were complete, unbiased, and accurate. Who knows how long your words will exist, but make them count right now, and if they do their job to inspire greatness, change, and more creativity, then they will become useless and unneeded with time. They will have led a revolution that will render them obsolete. Perhaps being made obsolete is the honor to strive for.

Will your words stand the test of time?

Brian Feinblum’s views, opinions, and ideas expressed in this blog are his alone and not that of his employer, the nation’s largest book promoter. You can follow him on Twitter @theprexpert and email him at brianfeinblum@gmail.com. He feels more important when discussed in the third-person. This is copyrighted by BookMarketingBuzzBlog 2013 ©

Do You Know Joseph Finder? by Brian Feinblum

My firm was just hired to promote the newest novel from Joseph Finder.  We’ll conduct a radio tour to promote the late June publication – a spy thriller.  We’ve promoted his books a number of times.  What surprises me is how many people never heard of him, although when I first started promoting him, I didn’t know of him either.

It’s interesting that someone as successful as he has been – five New York Times best-sellers with four million copies in print – can be under the radar.  Then again, in a country of 310 million, it’s easy for the vast majority to not recognize best-selling authors, movie stars, politicians, Grammy-winning musicians or leaders in major fields and industries. There is simply too much to keep track of.  Plus, the top people in their given area of expertise, may “only” have tens of millions of fans – or just a few million, still leaving 250+ million people who don’t know anything about the Joseph Finders of the world.

What surprises me is if something can break through, like a Harry Potter book, and gets lots of publicity, ad support, and praise from fans, how come it doesn’t go all the way, and get into the hands of practically everyone? Is it getting to the point that our society’s interest are so varied that we can’t get the majority to like the same thing or know about the same things?

Social media may be contributing to this, to a degree.  We’re fragmented.  Few national discussions or centralized platforms exist.  Instead we have people tweeting and blogging to a core group of self-selected followers and we have literally, millions of public discussions going on simultaneously but nothing to unite us.  And yet it is probably social media that affords us the best chance to rally the masses to focus on specific issues, people, events, or even books.

I know that we’ll schedule a great radio tour for Joseph Finder. We’ll get him a few dozen interviews with top tier markets and inform millions of listeners about him.  Now we just need to reach the other 300 million people.

Random Thought
51% of Americans ages 12 and older have profiles on Facebook, up from 8% in 2008, according to a recent Arbitron/Edison Research survey. What can you conclude from that? On one hand I’m surprised to see 49% don’t have profiles, but then again, why does this study include pre-teens? Does a kid really need a FB page?

I also thought about seniors who still may not be as active online as others, as well as illiterates, people who can’t afford a computer, and those that don’t speak English well. Really, that 51% number is probably more like 80% of people who are active and contributing to society. What’s most interesting is how in just a few short years the majority of the country lives on one social networking site. That’s a lot of power and potential there, but how are we harnessing it to market books and to make the world a better place? …

Google is king of the search marketing industry. Over two million searches take place using Google every minute, according to the New York Times.  An article last month caught my eye about a new search engine, Bekko, that is using a different approach in order to yield better results. If you use it, let me know if you find Bekko, to be better.

Brian Feinblum, Chief Marketing Officer, Planned Television Arts, has been promoting and marketing authors since 1989. feinblumb@plannedtvarts.com 212-583-2718 www.plannedtvarts.com . Brian Feinblum’s new blog is http://www.bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.com and he can be followed on Twitter @thePrexpert.